Resources For Planning a New Home or Remodel

custom home building process by demotte architects in ct

HIRING AN ARCHITECT - WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Advice to help guide you in your selection of an architect:
• The architectural phase is the most important part of the project & should not be rushed through or underestimated. This is where we’ll decide what will ultimately be built, and it’s easy & inexpensive to change lines on paper vs. moving walls during construction (which can get expensive).

• You should consider the selection of an architect as an investment in the value of the house (or addition or remodeling project) you’re planning on designing & building.

• Most good builders will tell you “good design is the single best dollar you can spend when building”, “never skimp on the initial architectural design” & “invest in design pros & trust them.”

• A good builder cannot fix a bad design, as they’re just building whatever was designed. A poor design will cost just as much to build as a good design, so you need to choose your architect wisely.

• It would be a mistake to hire an architect based on price alone, as the quality of both the design & construction drawings vary greatly among architects (which isn’t apparent to most homeowners). Just as you most likely would not hire the least expensive doctor or lawyer, you should not hire the least expensive architect.

• Your selection should be based on price, quality, service, & your comfort level with them. All too often it comes down to price, but you need to make sure you’re not sacrificing quality or service.

• Architectural fees (much like contractor’s estimates) can vary greatly for numerous reasons: how long they’ve been in business, size of the firm, whether they work from home or have an office with staff, their experience, how busy they are, & the quality of the work they do (this applies to both the design & construction drawings). There are no set rates when it comes to fees, so you need to understand what you’re getting for the price.

• “You get what you pay for” applies to this business. While we primarily provide a service, there’s also a product (being the design & construction drawings) – the quality of these can vary greatly.

• There are no standards when it comes to the quality & content of the construction drawings. What is “normal” for one architect may be very different from what you may get from another architect, which is typically reflected in the fee. A bare bones, stripped down set of construction drawings clearly takes less time to produce than a complete set of construction drawings (as an example: 6 sheets of drawings vs. 25 for the same house).

• The construction drawings are important; they are what the builders will be basing their estimate on & what they’ll be building from. The drawings are what your contract with them is based on. What you want is a detailed, complete set of construction drawings for them to work from. This is what the builders really want as well, as it makes their job so much easier. An inexpensive set of construction drawings leaves much to the imagination, so builders typically charge more to cover themselves of all the unknowns. They also leave you vulnerable to “change orders” & extras as the builders can say “it wasn’t on the plans, so it wasn’t in my bid… it’s an extra.”

• Talk to builders for references of good architects, as they know the good from the mediocre.

About DeMotte Architects
CT & NY residential architect established in 1990 with hundreds of projects completed to date (from small remodels to large custom homes) – We serve Fairfield County CT, Westchester County NY, and surrounding areas.

We’re not the most expensive architect out there nor the least expensive, but we’re very good at what we do and provide these services at a price point that results in a great value to you.

We work in projects of all styles because each home should be just as unique as its inhabitants.

We also know that nobody likes surprises during construction – which is why we provide a complete & detailed set of construction drawings. This way builders know exactly what the scope of work is and can provide a more accurate estimate for you, helping to keep the project on time & on budget.

HOW TO FIND THE BEST ARCHITECT FOR YOUR PROJECT

So you’ve decided to hire an architect… How do you find the right one for your project?
Since no two architects work in exactly the same way or charge exactly the same fees, be prepared to shop around and talk with several to find the one that’s right for you. Once you’ve spoken to several and narrowed it down, be prepared to meet in person. While you’re talking, assess the personality mix as this is one of many factors.

Your decision should be based on price, quality, service, & your comfort level with them. You’ll be working with this person for at least a few months, so it’s very important you get along & have a good rapport.

You should also consider the following:
• Does the architect seem interested in your project? Assessing this is completely subjective, but you want someone who is enthusiastic and understands your vision.

• How soon can the architect start? If he/she says in six months, look for someone else unless you’re willing to wait (which may or may not be worth it).

• When you see the architect’s portfolio of completed work, look for both style and substance. Does the architect seem versatile and comfortable with any number of styles? If you want a Tudor Style home and the architect has never done it, do you think he/she can handle it? If the portfolio shows that the architect is versatile, he/she can very likely work in many styles.

• Some architects have a marked preference for one or two styles, otherwise known as a “signature style.” While some architects are hired specifically for that reason, it may not work for all clients. You might possibly feel that you are being shoehorned into a style the architect prefers rather than one you prefer. You want to be open to new possibilities, but you are going to live in the house, so follow your gut instincts and design what you like & what appeals to you. After all – it’s your home!

• As the architect develops the design for your house, what will he/she do to help you visualize what’s being created? For example, does he/she make scale models or create sketches of exterior and interior perspective drawings?

• What time frame does the architect propose for designing your house? You should anticipate at least four months and likely more than that if you want a large house with many details.

• How long will it take to build the house? Six months to a year is about average.

Look at past projects & speak to past clients:
If things seem promising, go look at several of the architect’s completed projects and talk with the owners. Don’t worry about intrusive questions, as most people are willing to talk about their home building adventures and will be forthcoming. Several questions you should ask them are:

• How well did they get along with the architect?
• Were there any cost overruns? This is always a concern when building a never-built-before house.
• Did they feel they got what they paid for?
• How well did the architect handle disputes between the builder and the owners? The architect is supposed to be the owner’s advocate for such disputes.
• Does the house include any unusual design elements that you might want the architect to replicate in your house?

Next, talk to the builders the architect has worked with, especially the ones who built the houses you saw:
• How many houses has he built with this architect? If they’ve done a number of jobs together and know each others’ working styles, there’s less chance for miscommunication and errors.

• Were the architect’s drawings and written specifications useful and informative, useless and confusing, or somewhere in between? The clearer the construction documents, the easier and more smoothly the job will run.

• During construction, was the architect responsive to field questions? If it’s urgent, the architect should be available to answer questions right away.

• How often did the architect visit the site and was this a problem? Remember that whether or not the architect be involved during construction is solely based on the client’s desire to have them involved. If so, the frequency depends on the stage of construction – at some points he needs to be there once a week, at other times once a month will suffice.

• How well did the architect handle client- builder disputes? If the builder thinks the architect resolved disputes quickly and evenhandedly, it’s a sure sign the builder likes working with him/her.

Choosing an architect can be difficult if you don’t have experience in what to look for in a good architect. Doing your homework, knowing which questions to ask and what to look for when interviewing an architect, can help you avoid making an expensive mistake.

THE ARCHITECT SEARCH - QUESTIONS TO ASK

Interview questions to ask an architect during your architect search
(My answers included – owner & lead architect, Brad DeMotte):

EXPERIENCE:
· How long have you been in business? Since 1990

· How many employees are in your firm? 3 associates plus me

· What states are you licensed to practice in? NY & CT

· Where are most of your projects? Primarily Fairfield & Westchester County, but also Litchfield, Putnam, & Dutchess counties.

· Have you done projects in our town? Chances are, yes. I’ve worked in just about every town in Westchester County & Fairfield County.

· Have you done projects similar to ours? Chances are, yes… I do 20-30 projects a year for a total of 700 projects overall. I’ve designed houses & additions in numerous styles & have worked on projects of varying scales.

· What kind of projects do you primarily do? I specialize in residential work, and in any given year I might do a few custom homes or spec houses, along with addition & remodeling projects of all sizes & budgets. We also do small projects such as decks, garages, pool houses, along with basement & attic remodeling.

· Who will be working on my project? I (Brad DeMotte, owner & lead architect) will be the primary person you’ll be dealing with; I do all the design work & I’ll be meeting with you. My draftsmen perform other tasks such as measuring & drawing existing houses, or doing the construction drawings.

Note: The advantage of hiring a small firm is the personal service you receive from the principal. With larger firms, your project may be assigned to a project manager who you’ll most likely be dealing with and not the principal of the firm. In fact, the principal of a large firm may have very little involvement in your project, which may not be apparent to you.

· May we see examples of previous projects that are similar to our project (sketches, photos, plans)? Many of my projects can be seen on my website demottearchitects.com or my profile on Houzz.

· Can you provide the contact information of past clients for projects similar to ours, or other projects of yours? I typically provide a list of past clients that you can contact along with testimonials (this information is also available on my website).

· What is your design philosophy? Every project should be based on good design to meet your needs. If an addition is being designed to an existing house, it should look as if it was always there. Ideally, design should be timeless & not just trendy, and done according to your desires.

· What sets your firm apart from other architects with similar experience? We make ideas real… for every style, every budget. You deserve a home created just for you & we bring together a combination of great design, excellent construction drawings, & outstanding service. We are very good at what we do, doing so at a price point that results in a great value to you.

TIME FRAME:
· If hired, how soon can you start? Typically within days after receiving the signed contract, and we would have our first design meeting within 2-3 weeks after that.

· How long might the process (the architectural phase) take? This varies greatly depending on the project, but in general it may take from 3-4 months from start to finish for an average size project or 6 months to a year for a large custom home. This is also based on your ability to make decisions, as you’ll have a big part in how long the process takes.

· How soon might we be able to start construction? This varies based on the project, but in general once we start working on your project you may be 4-6 months away from starting construction.

Once the construction drawings are done, if you’re asking a few builders to provide estimates that process will take 2 months – giving builders 1 month to provide an estimate is normal, with the second month being used to pick a builder & then negotiate a contract.

Simultaneously, we must wait for the building dept. to review & approve the construction drawings (this can take anywhere from 2 weeks to 2 months). If other approvals are required (such as zoning variances, wetlands, health dept., architectural review board, or planning board approval) – they are prerequisites for being able to apply for a building permit & can add months to the approval process.

SERVICES:
· What level of service do you provide: “basic service”, “full service”, or somewhere in between?
I can provide any level of service you’d like, which may be based on your project along with your specific needs. I can do as much or as little as you like, but obviously the more time spent results in higher fees… but the benefit can far outweigh the additional cost.

· What is “basic service”?
“Basic service” includes services that must be provided at an absolute minimum. In the case of an addition, that would entail:
· measuring & drawing the house
· design development
· construction drawings
· meetings between us during the design & construction drawing phase
· completing the permit applications
· submitting the construction drawings for a building permit
· basic service could also include obtaining approvals for a zoning variance or architectural review board

For a custom home, basic services are essentially the same except for not measuring & drawing the existing house.

· What is “full service”?
“Full service” includes all of the “basic services” along with being involved during the construction process which typically includes:
· providing a “bid form” during the estimating process
· reviewing the bids & advising the client on contractor selection
· reviewing the chosen builder’s contract
· site visits to monitor construction
· rejecting nonconforming work
· reviewing & certifying payment requests
· reviewing shop drawings
· interpreting or clarifying the construction drawings for the contractor
Many of these “extra services” are of great value to you and can be provided during the bidding & construction phases. These services can be provided on an as-needed basis.

· What is the benefit of involving the architect during construction?
Because the architect designed the project & did the construction drawings, the architect knows what he/she is asking the builder to do. Without the architect’s oversight & involvement, you’re completely relying on the builder & the building inspector that the project is being built according to the construction drawings. If the architect is not involved, he/she cannot ensure the project is built according to the construction drawings. There are numerous decisions to be made during the construction process, & involving the architect is highly recommended.

FEES:
· What will the fees be for my project? This cannot be determined upfront without knowing more about the specifics of your project and what level of service you’re requesting.

Fees are based on: scope of work: construction cost, degree of difficulty & complexity; approval process: ZBA, ARB, Planning Board, Wetlands, Health Dept.; level of service requested: “basic service” or “full service”

· How are fees established? Fees can be based on 1 of 3 ways:
· as a percentage of the construction cost (varies from 5%-15%)
· as a flat fee
· on an hourly basis

Most clients are comfortable with a flat fee, so most of my contracts are written that way. Flat fees have a time cap; otherwise it’s completely open-ended on my end.

· What will the fee schedule be? I typically require a small deposit prior to starting, then invoices are written monthly based on time expended.

· How do you establish fees for additional services and reimbursable expenses? When writing my initial proposal, some additional services can be included in the flat fee if we know that they’re either required or desired. Some additional services (like site visits during construction) are billed on an hourly basis due to the intangible time factor. Reimbursable services (such as printing or shipping costs) are included in monthly invoices.

· If consultants (surveyor, civil, structural, mechanical, etc) are necessary, are their fees covered in your basic fee or are they separate? If consultants are needed, I typically involve those I work with on a regular basis and ask them to provide a contract to you and you’ll hire them directly. A structural engineer is needed for most of my projects and the fee is billed as a reimbursable expense.

WHAT IS THE INITIAL MEETING WITH AN ARCHITECT LIKE?

In the initial meeting, we’ll get to know each other & discuss your residential ideas and goals. It’s a stress-free, no-obligation meeting preferably on the job site, but can be held anywhere. Schedule a free consultation today.

Consider the following for the first meeting:
-What do you want to do? Consider design & home goals.
-Which style or styles do you like? / Which styles do you dislike? (Bring photos if desired)
-What is you budget for the project?
-When would you like to start?

ARCHITECTURAL FEES EXPLAINED

· What will the fees be for my project? This cannot be determined upfront without knowing more about the specifics of your project and what level of service you’re requesting.

Fees are based on:
· Scope of work, construction cost, degree of difficulty & complexity
· Approval process: ZBA, ARB, Planning Board, Wetlands, Health Dept.
· Level of service requested (“basic service” or “full service”)

· How are fees established? Fees can be based on 1 of 3 ways:
· as a percentage of the construction cost (varies from 5%-15%)
· as a flat fee
· on an hourly basis

Most clients are comfortable with a flat fee, so most of my contracts are written that way. Flat fees have a time cap; otherwise it’s completely open-ended on my end.

· What will the fee schedule be? I typically require a small deposit prior to starting, then invoices are written monthly based on time expended.

· How do you establish fees for additional services and reimbursable expenses? When writing my initial proposal, some additional services can be included in the flat fee if we know that they’re either required or desired. Some additional services (like site visits during construction) are billed on an hourly basis due to the intangible time factor. Reimbursable services (such as printing or shipping costs) are included in monthly invoices.

· If consultants (surveyor, civil, structural, mechanical, etc) are necessary, are their fees covered in your basic fee or are they separate? If consultants are needed, I typically involve those I work with on a regular basis and ask them to provide a contract to you and you’ll hire them directly. A structural engineer is needed for most of my projects and the fee is billed as a reimbursable expense.

TIME FRAME EXPLAINED

· If hired, how soon can you start? Typically within days after receiving the signed contract, and we would have our first design meeting within 2-3 weeks after that.

· How long might the process (the architectural phase) take? This varies greatly depending on the project, but in general it may take from 3-4 months from start to finish for an average size project or 6 months to a year for a large custom home. This is also based on your ability to make decisions, as you’ll have a big part in how long the process takes.

· How soon might we be able to start construction? This varies based on the project, but in general once we start working on your project you may be 4-6 months away from starting construction.

Once the construction drawings are done, if you’re asking a few builders to provide estimates that process will take 2 months. Giving the builders 1 month to provide an estimate is normal, with the second month being used to pick a builder & then negotiate a contract.

Simultaneously, we must wait for the building dept. to review & approve the construction drawings (this can take anywhere from 2 weeks to 2 months). If other approvals are required (such as zoning variances, wetlands, health dept., architectural review board, or planning board approval) – they are prerequisites for being able to apply for a building permit & can add months to the approval process.

COMMON TERMS IN ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION

Appraisal: An evaluation or estimate (based on factual analysis) of the fair market value, cost, utility, or other attribute of land or a building, which takes selling price of comparable houses in the area into account.

Architect: One who designs buildings and advises in their construction.

Architectural Review Board: An approval required by some towns that have a say in the design of a proposed addition or new construction. The equivalent of the “fashion police.”

Building Code: National, state, and local regulations which outline mandatory standards for building construction to ensure public health and safety.

Building Inspector: A town, village, or city employee of the building department who reviews & approves plans, issues building permits, & approves construction work in progress.

Building Footprint: The gross square footage of the ground floor level of a building, including livable & non-livable space.

Change Order: An agreement between a contractor and homeowner to add work or make a substitution of materials after the contract has been signed, with the additional work & cost reflected in writing. Change orders should be signed & agreed to by the owner before the additional work is started.

Conditional Lien Release: A form submitted to the owner, on a regular basis, along with billing statements, signifying what is currently owed to subs or suppliers & that they are being paid for certain materials or work as agreed to.

Contingency Amount: Money set aside by the owner to allow for unpredictable or unforeseen work or changes, including an increase in the scope of work due to changes by the owner.

Contract: A legally enforceable, binding agreement between two or more persons or parties (typically between the homeowner & contractor). A business arrangement for the supply of certain goods or services at a fixed price, or based on a percentage of the total project cost.

Design / Bid / Build: The traditional route where an architect would design the project & do the construction drawings. A few builders would then be asked to bid on the project (known as “competitive bidding”). One builder would be hired who would then complete the project.

Design / Build: One firm is hired (which is typically a builder) who would design the project, do the construction drawings, & then build the project. A builder has expanded his services to provide architectural services in-house.

Easement: A right given by the owner of a piece of land to an individual or other entity for a specific limited use or enjoyment of that land. Easements could be for utilities or the right to travel across.

Floor Area: The sum total of the floors of a building, typically calculated from the exterior face of the perimeter walls. Finished floor area includes living space only, while gross floor area includes non-livable spaces like garages.

Impervious Surface: Any hard surface on a property that prevents water from being absorbed into the ground, including buildings, driveways, terraces, decks, pools, etc.

General Contractor (or “Builder”): A company that provides for the construction of a project & oversees the project to completion. They assemble a team of subcontractors (mechanical, structural, electrical) & fulfill a range of duties including, ordering materials, arranging deliveries, scheduling trades, billing, accounting, etc.

Job Closeout: As the project nears completion, the phase that refers to the final clean up & inspections which must occur before the project is finished.

Lien: A right legally enforceable against a specific property to secure payment of an obligation.

Mechanic’s Lien Foreclosure: A legal action by which a subcontractor or supplier has the right to attach and ultimately sell property if they are not paid by the owner.

Punch List: At “substantial completion,” a comprehensive listing of every unfinished or unsatisfactory element of the project, usually completed by the architect, client, and/or builder.

Remodel: To make changes to an existing building, including additions and/or alterations.

Retainer Fee: A fee paid in advance to a professional adviser for advice or services.

Soft Costs: Money spent towards a project, but not directly towards construction. Includes payments to an architect or other design professionals (surveyors, civil engineers, structural engineers, landscape architects, etc).

Soils Report: A report of test results conducted by a laboratory to determine the stability of soil, its permeability and bearing capacity.

Subcontractor (or “Sub”): Someone who contracts with a general contractor to perform work on a specific part of a construction project, such as excavation, plumbing, electrical work, or landscaping.

Substantial Completion: The point at which a building can be used for its intended purpose.

Unconditional Lien Release: A form provided by a subcontractor or supplier to an owner that they have completed their work & have been paid by the contractor, & that they fully relinquish any lien rights against the property.

Warranty: A written guarantee of the integrity of a product & of the manufacturer’s responsibility for the repair or replacement of defective parts. A period of limited guarantee.

Zoning Code: The regulations established by a town, village, or city that govern how a property can be developed. Limitations include maximum allowable floor area, height, distance from property lines, building coverage, impervious surface coverage, etc.

Zoning Variance: A special approval required by a town, village, or city when some aspect of a proposed project does not conform to the zoning regulations.

HOW TO SELECT THE RIGHT BUILDER

When choosing a builder, you might spend just as much time (or more) searching for one as you will to find an architect. The criteria is essentially the same, being price, quality, service, & your comfort level with them. There are many ways to go about this search, & the following would be my recommendation in order of preference:

· Ask your architect. It’s a small world out there in construction, & your architect should know many local builders (both the good & the bad). He should be able to recommend a few builders who he’s worked with, likes their work & thinks they’d be a good fit for you & your project.

· Ask friends, family, & neighbors who’ve hired builders in the past & had good experiences.

· Ask your realtor, a local home builders association, or any subcontractors (like electricians or plumbers) who you’ve hired in the past.

· Ask the local building inspector or lumberyard, as both know who’s good & who’s not.

· Do an online search for local builders in your area & then check out their website. Sites like “Houzz” are very good places to find builders, architects, & interior designers.

· Use an online service that matches builders to homeowners such as Home AdvisorAngie’s ListThumbtackPorchBark, etc. These sites pre-screen builders for legal and credit problems as well as check for licenses, liability insurance, and references.

Whatever route you take to find builders, you should still go through the process of deciding on one that’s right for you. You might decide to engage a builder early in the design process (which is recommended), or you may wait until the construction drawings are done & you’re ready to get estimates.

In your initial phone call, you should pre-qualify the builder to see if he’s a good fit for your project based on some general questions such as:

· What kind of projects does he usually build and what’s the construction cost of those projects? Some builders are geared to do small projects while others are geared to do larger projects. If it’s too big or too small relative to what he normally does, he most likely will not be interested.

· Has he built projects similar in size & scale to yours? While theoretically a good builder should be able to build anything, building an 8000 SF modern house requires a different skill set than building a 2000 SF Colonial. If your high-end house may cost $400/SF & all he’s built are low-end houses at $200/SF, he may not be the right choice.

· Where is his office based & how far is he willing to travel? Some builders think nothing of traveling for an hour, while others don’t want to leave town.

· Based on the information you’ve provided, is he interested & available for your project?

Once you’ve narrowed down a short list of builders to consider, you should set up a meeting to discuss your project in more detail. This meeting would ideally be at your house so he can see your house & property.

Hiring a builder is like a short term marriage… you’ll be working very closely with them for 6 months to a year and the project may be very stressful at times, so you need to at least like them in order to get along. He should have a portfolio of finished projects, whether it be photographs or a website. You should look at their work very carefully for both style and substance, and consider these questions:

· How many projects does he build at one time? The answer may depend on the size of his business. Smaller builders will take on very few projects at the same time & are typically very “hands-on,” while bigger builders might have 5-10 projects running at the same time, with project managers for each.

· How soon can he start your project? If he’s interested in your project but won’t free up for 6 months you might consider waiting, if you feel it’s worthwhile.

· Can he provide references of past clients? He should have a long list of past clients that you should be able to speak to. Ideally, current or very recent clients are the best to talk to.

· Many homeowners find that the process of selecting all the fixtures & finishes throughout the house can be overwhelming. Some builders will assist you in this process while others simply want you to make decisions, with them just doing the installation. Does the builder offer you help in making these selections, or can he refer you to interior designers, showrooms & suppliers? Does he accompany you to showrooms & suppliers, or are you on your own?

Once you’ve narrowed down your selection to a few builders, ask each for a list of their recent clients. If you’re not comfortable calling, read reviews from their past clients which should be available online (which can be positive as well as negative). If you call, contact several of them to discuss their perspective on the builder & be sure to ask the following questions:

· Did you like the builder (once the project was completed)?

· Would you hire the builder again, or recommend them to others?

· Was the project delivered on time & on budget?

· Was he responsive (by phone & email) & available during the course of the project?

· Was he on the job daily to check on the progress & to answer any questions?

· If there were disputes, were you able to resolve them amicably?

· Did he come back to fix things after the project was complete? It’s fairly normal that there may be some minor things that require attention during the first year, such as sheetrock cracks due to the house settling or lumber shrinkage.

At this point, it’s also advisable to see their work in person. Seeing a builder’s work on a website is one thing but seeing a house in person is preferable. Keep in mind that they didn’t design it, they just built it. You’re not assessing what the architect designed or what the homeowner’s tastes are, you’re looking at the “fit & finish.” Look closely at the trim joints & the overall quality of the work.

Selecting the right builder is not an easy task and should be done carefully. You’re putting an awful lot of trust into one person, & you want to be assured you’re making the right decision. Construction should be fun, but it can also be trying at times. It can be an emotional roller coaster with highs & lows, and having the right builder will make it all that much easier to deal with.

TYPES OF CONTRACTS BETWEEN OWNER & BUILDER

Lump Sum (Fixed Price)

  • Cap on price and fee
  • Limited financial risk to owner
  • Contractor takes majority of financial risk
  • Contractor does not share project financial information with owner
  • Cost savings and cost overruns accrue to contractor
  • All changes from plans should be documented by change order
  • Ambiguous and/or poor drawings may leave the owner vulnerable to numerous extras and change orders

 

Cost Plus A Fixed Fee

  • No cap on price, yet there is a cap on the contractor’s fee
  • Owner’s share of financial risk limited to hard costs (labor and material) only
  • All cost savings and cost overruns accrue to owner
  • Contractor shares all project financial information with the owner
  • All changes from plans should be documented by change order

 

Cost Plus A Fee (Time And Materials)

  • No cap on price and contractor’s fee
  • Owner has all the financial risk
  • All cost savings and overruns accrue to owner
  • Contractor shares all project financial information with the owner
  • All changes from plans should be documented by change order

 

Cost Plus With A “Not To Exceed” Or “Max” Figure

  • Cap on price
  • Cap on fee
  • Limited financial risk to owner and contractor
  • Cost savings may either accrue to owner or be split with contractor as an incentive
  • Cost overruns accrue to contractor
  • Contractor shares project financial information with owner
  • All changes from plans should be documented by change order

THE ESTIMATING & BIDDING PROCESS EXPLAINED

Once the architect is done with the construction drawings, the next step is to give the drawings to builders so they can provide estimates. Once a builder is chosen, you’ll need to ask them for a contract. You may choose to go this process alone, or you may choose to involve the architect to help you through this.

While you could simply give each builder a set of construction drawings & ask for an estimate, there are flaws to this approach. The problem with only providing construction drawings to bid from is that each builder will provide a written estimate in their own format, and each format will be very different as each builder has their own way of doing things. If there are materials that haven’t been selected yet (which we call “allowances” such as tile, wood flooring, cabinets, counters, appliances, plumbing fixtures, etc.), left to their own devices builders will do 1 of 2 things. They’ll either leave these costs out of their estimate entirely, or they’ll each be guessing at what you might be spending for these… with some of the guesses being wildly different. Both of these scenarios will result in estimates that will be very hard to compare to another, making your selection that much more difficult.

The best way to create a level playing field among the builders is to have the architect provide a “Bid Form” which will help you evaluate the bids & then pick the builder who you feel will give you the most value. This can save you a significant amount of money by ensuring that you’re getting the best price relative to other comparable bids.

Invitation to Bid Form:

The “Invitation to Bid” form is used to supplement the construction drawings once they’re ready to be released to builders for estimating.

The Bid Form is essentially a standardized form given to each builder which they’ll complete & return. They’ll enter values into each line item for labor & materials, while also disclosing their profit & overhead. The Bid Form also takes all the guesswork away from the builders for all of the “allowances,” as the architect will set those values so each builder is not guessing at what those materials may cost. These numbers for the allowances are just placeholders, but should be close to what you’ll ultimately be spending for each item.

Bid Form Review:

Once the Bid Forms are returned, a spreadsheet can be created to easily compare all bids. If any big discrepancies are seen among certain line items, the builders can be asked to clarify what exactly was included, or if something was placed elsewhere on the Bid Form or possibly overlooked altogether. Two builders might have been providing very different HVAC systems in terms of quality and price point, and you could now ask each to bid on the same exact system.

As an example, out of 4 bids you may narrow it down to 2 builders and then go back to those 2 builders and ask them to clarify certain questions we may have about their bids. They may then revise and resubmit their bid, at which point you’re assured that both builders are bidding on the exact same scope of work.

Builder Selection:

Selecting a builder is no easy task, but the criteria should be price, quality, service, & your comfort level with them. While choosing the lowest bid is often attractive for obvious reasons, you need to make sure that you’re not compromising on quality & service.

If the architect knows the builders, he may be able to offer his opinion on who might provide better quality or service & a better overall experience, especially if the price is comparable between 2 builders. Even if he doesn’t know the builders, he may still be a better evaluator of builders & help you make an informed decision.

Review of Builder’s Contract:

Once a builder is chosen, he would then be asked to submit a contract for your review & approval. Each builder has their own way of doing things, so one builder’s contract could be very different from another. Some contracts are very simple and one-sided, being in the builder’s favor & not being fair to you by not including many of the things that should be addressed in a construction contract.

The preferred contract is one of the many versions of the AIA (American Institute of Architects) contracts, sometimes with a rider attached to cover additional issues. The contracts and riders are typically done by the builder’s lawyer, but it’s highly recommended that you either have the architect or a lawyer versed in construction law review the contract to make sure it’s fair to you. Simply put, “you don’t know what you don’t know” about construction contracts (such as retainage & lien releases), but the architect does and is there to protect you.

Summary:

Involving the architect during the bidding & builder selection phase doesn’t cost a lot & is money well spent considering that selecting the right builder is critical to the success of the project. If you haven’t been through this process before, it’s highly advisable to have the architect by your side to help you make the right decisions.

GREEN DESIGN IDEAS

The following concepts can be used in whole or in part to provide a house that:

  • Doesn’t squander scarce non-renewable resources (oil, gas, old growth trees)
  • Doesn’t harm the environment
  • Is free of toxic chemicals, dust, pollen, bacteria & allergens
  • Reduces utility costs & reduces maintenance

Energy Efficiency:

  • Geothermal heat pumps (provides heating and cooling at a fraction the cost of conventional systems but are the most expensive)
  • High efficiency HVAC equipment (SEER rating: +14)
  • Spray foam insulation (open cell or closed cell, soybean based)
  • Wet spray cellulose insulation (85% recycled content: newspapers)
  • Cotton (recycled denim) batt insulation (natural fibers with no allergens)
  • Energy recovery ventilation (ERV) system
  • Tankless water heater
  • Solar water heater
  • Programmable thermostats
  • Air sealing the building envelope
  • High performance windows (double or triple glazed with low E glass)
  • Energy Star rated appliances & light fixtures

Water Efficiency:

  • Drought resistant landscaping (to reduce water use)
  • Rainwater collection (reuse water for lawn & plant watering)
  • Dual flush toilets (saves 7000 gallons/year)
  • “WaterSense” rated plumbing fixtures (by the EPA)
  • Hot water recirculating pumps activated by motion sensors (significant water & energy savings)

Renewable Energy Sources:

  • Geothermal heat pumps
  • Solar hot water heating (generates electricity and/or hot water)
  • Wind power (generates electricity)

Site Planning & Site Preparation:

  • Site work that minimizes environmental impact before & after construction
  • Proper building orientation to maximize solar gain (passive solar)
  • Erosion control
  • Use natural/native landscaping (reduces water consumption)
  • Plant trees for summer shade
  • Use of permeable paving materials to minimize water runoff

Project Design:

  • Smaller building footprint
  • Locally appropriate design
  • Deep overhangs to reduce summer heat gain

Indoor Air Quality:

  • Whole house balanced ventilation system
  • Prevent pollutant sources (non-toxic, formaldehyde free materials)
  • Electrostatic air cleaners (trap 99% of pollen & mold spores, 98% of bacteria sized particles, 94% of respirable dust & 80% of virus-sized particles)
  • Radon mitigation

Construction “Best Practices”:

  • Air sealing the building envelope
  • Water managed detailing (“rain screen” walls, flashing, etc)

Material Selection:

  • Use of recycled & salvaged materials (i.e. wood timbers)
  • Use of sustainable materials (i.e. bamboo flooring)
  • Non-toxic, formaldehyde-free materials (i.e. plywood, insulation, cabinets)
  • Lumber: engineered lumber (saves old growth forests)
  • Siding: fiber cement siding, cedar clapboards or shingles
  • Roofing: shingles made from recycled plastic, stone coated metal roofing
  • Decking: wood composite decking (i.e. “Trex”)
  • Paint: low or zero VOC paints, water based paints or stains
  • Flooring: FSC certified wood flooring, bamboo, cork, linoleum, carpet made of recycled plastic
  • Lighting: Halogen or LED bulbs

Sources for Green Certification:

LOCAL SHOWROOMS & MATERIALS

Kitchen appliances & outdoor grills:

Aitoro Appliance (Norwalk)…………………………….. www.aitoro.com

County TV & Appliance (Stamford)…………………. www.countytv.com

Village Appliance (Port Chester)……………………… www.villageappliancesinc.com

Albano Appliance (Pound Ridge)…………………….. www.albanoappliance.com

Royal Green Appliance Center (White Plains)…. www.royalgreenny.com

 

Kitchen & bath plumbing fixtures:

Best Plumbing (Stamford, Scarsdale, Yorktown, Somers)…. www.bestplg.com

Bender (Norwalk, Stamford)…………………………………………….. www.bendershowrooms.com

Waterware (Stamford & Fairfield)……………………………………. www.waterwareshowrooms.com

Kohler Signature Store (Westport)…………………………………… www.kohlersignaturestorewestport.com

Torrco (Danbury, Fairfield, Stamford) …………………………..…. www.torrcodesigncenter.com

Creative Bath (Brookfield) …………………………………………….…. www.thecreativebath.com

ProSource (Stamford)………………………………………………………. www.prosourcewholesale.com

Clarke Living (Norwalk) ………………………………………………….… www.clarkeliving.com

Frank Webb Home (Stamford, Mamaroneck) ………………….. www.frankwebb.com

Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting (Mt. Kisco) …………………. www.ferguson.com

Porcelanosa (Greenwich)…………………………………………………. www.porcelanosa-usa.com

 

Tile:

Walker Zanger (Port Chester)…………………………………………… www.walkerzanger.com

Best Plumbing (Stamford, Scarsdale, Yorktown, Somers)…. www.bestplg.com

Bender (Norwalk, Stamford)……………………………………………. www.bendershowrooms.com

Waterware (Stamford, Fairfield)………………………………………. www.waterwareshowrooms.com

Kohler Signature Store (Westport) ………………………………….. www.kohlersignaturestorewestport.com

Tile America (Stamford, Fairfield, Brookfield) ………………….. www.tileamerica.com

Sam’s Ceramic & Tile (White Plains) ………………………………… www.samstilewp.com

Porcelanosa (Greenwich)……………………………………………….… www.porcelanosa-usa.com

Eurostyle Marble & Tile (Carmel)……………………………………… www.eurostylehomedesign.com

 

Granite & marble slabs (only):

Walker Zanger (Port Chester)………… www.walkerzanger.com

Fordham Marble (Stamford)………….. www.fordhammarble.com

US Granite (Danbury)…………………..… www.usgraniteinc.com

La Pietra (Brookfield, Ridgefield)……. www.lapietramarble.com

Stone Resources (Danbury)………..…. www.stoneresourcesct.com

Douro (Bethel) …………………………..…. www.dourogranitedanbury.com

Paramount Stone (Stamford) ……….. www.paramountstone.com

Connecticut Stone (Milford)………….. www.connecticutstone.com

Everest Stone (Norwalk)………………… www.everestmarblect.com

Academy Marble & Granite (Rye)….. www.academy-marble.com

Rye Marble (Rye)……………………….….. www.ryemarble.com

 

Stone veneer, brick veneer & pavers:

O & G (Stamford, Danbury, Bridgeport)….. www.ogind.com

Byram Mason (Port Chester)………………….. www.byrammason.com

Bedford Stone (Bedford)………………………… www.bedfordstone.com

Gault (Westport, Bethel)………………………… www.gaultstone.com

Paramount Stone (Stamford) …………………. www.paramountstone.com

Connecticut Stone (Milford)……………………. www.connecticutstone.com

 

Lumberyards (windows, doors, door hardware, interior trim, decking, deck railings):

Interstate Lumber (Greenwich) ……………………………………………………………………. www.interstatelumber.com

Ring’s End Lumber (Darien, Norwalk, Bethel, Wilton, Westport. Lewisboro)… www.ringsend.com

Ridgefield Supply (Ridgefield)……………………………………………………………………….. www.ridgefieldsupply.com

Weed & Duryea (New Canaan) ………………………………………………………………….…. www.nbslumber.com

Hatch & Bailey (Stamford, Norwalk) …………………………………………………………….. www.hatchandbailey.com

Woodbury Supply (Woodbury) …………………………………………………………………….  www.woodburysupply.com

 

Window & door showrooms:

Interstate Lumber (Greenwich) …………………………………………………………………… www.interstatelumber.com

Ring’s End Lumber (Darien, Norwalk, Bethel, Wilton, Westport. Lewisboro).. www.ringsend.com

Ridgefield Supply (Ridgefield)………………………………………………………………………. www.ridgefieldsupply.com

Windowrama (Stamford, Brookfield, Mt. Kisco, Hartsdale)…………………………… www.windowrama.com

Pella Windows (Norwalk, Monroe) ……………………………………………………………… www.pella.com

 

Window shades, blinds & drapes:

The Shade Store (Westport, Greenwich, Port Chester) …….. www.theshadestore.com

 

Wood flooring, carpet, tile:

Prestige Flooring (White Plains)…………………………… www.prestigefi.com

ProSource (Stamford)………………………………………….. www.prosourcewholesale.com

The Hudson Company (Ridgefield) ……………………… www.thehudsonco.com

PC Hardwood Floors (Danbury) …………………………… www.pcwoodfloors.com

Floor Coverings International (Fairfield, Stamford, Port Chester, New Rochelle, Katonah)………… www.floorcoveringsinternational.com

Kellogg Hardwood Lumber (wide plank) (Bethel)…. www.kellogghardwoods.com

Conway Hardwood Products (Gaylordsville) ……….. www.conwayhardwood.com

 

Timber beams, barn siding, reclaimed lumber:

The Hudson Company (Pine Plains, NY)…………. www.thehudsonco.com

New England Antique Lumber (Mt. Kisco)……… www.newenglandantiquelumber.com

Ghent Wood Products (Ghent, NY)………………… www.ghentwoodproducts.com

 

Closet organizers:

Connecticut Closet & Shelf (Norwalk)……………………… View on Houzz

The Closet Factory (Bethel)……………………………………… www.closetfactory.com

Closet Creations (Sleepy Hollow)…………………………….. www.closetcreationsinc.com

California Closets (Norwalk, Shelton, Hawthorne) ….. www.californiaclosets.com

 

Light fixtures:

Patdo (Port Chester)………………. www.patdolight.com

Circa Lighting (Greenwich)……… www.circalighting.com

Bender (Norwalk, Stamford)…… www.bendershowrooms.com

 

Glass shower doors & mirrors:

Ridgefield Glass (Ridgefield)………………………………… www.ridgefieldglass.com

Dimensions in Glass (Fairfield)…………………………….. www.dimensionsinglass.com

American Frameless/Westport Glass (Westport)… www.americanframeless.com

Clearview (Bridgeport)………………………………………… www.clearviewinc.net

Mr. Shower Door (Stratford)……………………………….. www.mrshowerdoor.com

Mirage Mirror & Glass (Briarcliff Manor)…………….. www.miragemirrorandglass.com

 

Smart home, audio/video, home theater:

Innerspace Electronics (Port Chester)……………………………… www.innerspaceelectronics.com

Westchester Audio Visual Design Group (White Plains)…….. www.westchesterav.com

Advanced Home Audio (Shelton)………………………………………. www.advancedhomeaudio.com

Stratatech (Norwalk)…………………………………………………………. www.stratatech.com

Lifetronic Systems (Westport)…………………………………………… www.lifetronic.net

Enviance Control (Norwalk)………………………………………………. www.enviancecontrol.com

 

Wood stoves, gas stoves, & prefabricated fireplaces:

House of Warmth (New Milford) ………… www.houseofwarmth.com

Black Swan (Newtown, New Milford)….. www.blackswanhome.com

Yankee Doodle (Wilton) ……………………… www.yankeedoodleinc.com

Westchester Fireplace (Elmsford) ………. www.westchesterfireplace.com

 

Kitchen designers/showrooms:

Deane (Stamford, New Canaan)…………………… www.deaneinc.com

Bilotta (Mamaroneck, Mt. Kisco)………………….. www.bilotta.com

Majestic Kitchens (Mamaroneck)…………………. www.majestickitchens.com

East Hill Cabinetry (White Plains) ………………… www.easthillcabinetry.com

Nu Kitchens (South Norwalk)……………………….. www.nukitchens.com

Front Row Kitchens (Norwalk) …….………………. www.frontrowkitchens.com

Kingswood Kitchens (Danbury, Norwalk)……… www.kingswoodkitchens.com

Kitchen & Bath Source (White Plains) ………….. www.kbskitchen.com

 

Pool designers/installers:

Shoreline Pools (Stamford) ………………… www.shorelinepools.com

Anthony & Sylvan Pools (Westport)……. www.anthonysylvan.com

Coral Sea Pools (Briarcliff Manor) ……… www.coralseapools.com

Haggerty Pools (Norwalk) …………………… www.haggertypools.com

Signature Pools (Norwalk) ………………….. www.signaturepoolsinc.com

Glen Gate (Wilton) ……………………………… www.glengatecompany.com

Bedford Poolscapes (Bedford)…………….. www.bedfordpoolscapes.com

 

Furniture:

Lillian August (Norwalk, Greenwich, Stamford)…… www.lillianaugust.com

Safavieh (Stamford) …………………………………………… www.safaviehhome.com

Ethan Allen (Danbury, Norwalk) …………………………. www.ethanallen.com

 

Vintage, salvage, bargain shopping:

Renovation Angel (Fairfield, NJ)………. www.renovationangel.com

United House Wrecking (Stamford)…. www.unitedhousewrecking.com

Monger’s Market (Bridgeport)…………. on Facebook

 

Places to donate kitchen & bathroom cabinets, appliances (free removal):

Urban Miners (Bridgeport)…………. www.urbanminers.com

Renovation Angel (Fairfield, NJ)….. www.renovationangel.com

RECOMMENDED PROFESSIONALS

KITCHEN DESIGNERS

Bilotta
Mamaroneck, NY
914-381-7734
Randy O’Kane randy@bilotta.com
www.bilotta.com

Deane
Stamford, CT
203-327-7008
Trish Herson trishh@deaneinc.com
www.deaneinc.com

East Hill Cabinetry
White Plains, NY
914-432-7341
Anthony Maucieri anthony@easthillcabinetry.com
www.easthillcabinetry.com

Nu Kitchens
South Norwalk, CT
203-831-9000
info@nukitchens.com
www.nukitchens.com

Majestic Kitchens
Mamaroneck, NY
914-381-1302
Paul Guttmann pguttmann@majestickitchens.com
www.majestickitchens.com

Studio Dearborn
Mamaroneck, NY
914-815-2707
Sarah Robertson sarah@dearborncabinetry.com
www.studiodearborn.com

Shore & Country Kitchens
Fairfield, CT
203-259-7555
Jim Cummings jim@shoreandcountrykitchens.com
www.shoreandcountrykitchens.com

Kingswood Kitchens
Danbury, CT
203-792-8700
www.kingswoodkitchens.com

Karen Berkemeyer Home
Westport, CT
203-454-0032
Iris Michaels iris@kbhomeltd.com
www.karenberkemeyerhome.com

JWH Designs
Rye, NY
914-967-6020
Jennifer Howard jhoward@jwhdesigns.com
www.jwhdesigns.com

JEM Woodworking
Cos Cob, CT
203-769-1019
833-734-5306 (Hudson, NY office)
www.jemwoodworking.com

INTERIOR DESIGNERS

John Cinti Designs, LLC
Fairfield, CT
203-292-8844
John Cinti john@jcintidesigns.com
www.jcintidesigns.com

Private Eye Design
Greenwich, CT
203-273-9697
Lori Samuel lori@privateeyedesign.com

McBrien Interiors
Fairfield, CT
914-441-0450
Tori McBrien tori@mcbrieninteriors.com
www.mcbrieninteriors.com

Beth Rosenfield Design LLC
Ridgefield, CT
203-438-6823
Beth Rosenfield beth@bethrosenfielddesign.com

Karen Bow Interiors
Darien, CT
914-953-1517
Karen Bow karenbow@mac.com
www.karenbow.com

Robin Christine Interior Design
Rye Brook, NY
914-937-4196
Robin Claudio robinclaudio@yahoo.com

SURVEYORS / CIVIL ENGINEERS

Arthur Howland & Associates
New Milford, CT
860-354-9346
Paul Szymanski pszymanski@ahhowland.com
www.ahhowland.com

CCA, LLC
Brookfield, CT
203-775-6207
CJ Osborne (surveyor) charlesosborne@ccaengineering.com
Steve Sullivan (engineer) stevensullivan@ccaengineering.com

The Huntington Co.
Fairfield, CT
203-259-1091
www.huntllc.net

Sound View Engineers & Surveyors
Greenwich, CT
203-532-1300
Aidan Mcann aidan@soundviewengineers.com
www.soundviewengineers.com

Rocco D’Andrea, Inc
Riverside, CT
203-637-1779
Tony D’Andrea ald@rvdi.com
www.rvdi.com

S.E. Minor & Co.
Greenwich, CT
203-869-0136
Info@seminor.com
www.seminor.com

Insite Engineering
Carmel, NY
845-225-9690
Jeff Contelmo (engineer) jcontelmo@insite-eng.com
Jeff DeRosa (surveyor) jderosa@insite-eng.com

Gabriel Senor Engineers
Hartsdale, NY
914-422-0070
Eliot Senor, P.E. info@gesenor.com
www.gabrielesenorpc.com

SURVEYORS

Brautigam and Surveyors
Newtown, CT
203-270-7810
Paul Brautigam surveyor@brautigamland.com

Terry Bergendorff Collins
Brewster, NY
845-279-4261
Terry Collins tcollins@terrybergendorffcollins.com

John Farnsworth & Associates
New Milford, CT
860-354-1251
Charles Farnsworth Charlesfarnsworth@charter.net

Edward Frattaroli
Stamford, CT
203-359-2235
Info@frattaroli.com

Paul Hiro, P.C.
New Milford, CT
860-354-6599
paulhiro@gmail.com

Sydney Rapp L.S.
Danbury, CT
203-744-6261
Zach Rapp maps@sarlandsurveying.com

Stalker Land Surveying
Wilton, CT
203-563-0048
Roger Stalker Roger@stalkerls.com

Thomas Merritts L.S.
Pleasantville, NY
914-769-8003
Dan Merritts daniel@tcmerritts.com

William Seymour & Ass.
Darien, CT
203-655-3331
www.wws-ls.com

Aristotle Bournazos, P.C.
New Rochelle, NY
914-633-0100
Bill Simon absurv@aol.com

Earth Image Dot Net, LLC
Greenwich, CT
203-661-3897
Mike Finkbeiner mwf@earthimage.net

Stanley Johnson & Co.
Mount Kisco, NY
914-241-3872
Rob Johnson rsjls@optonline.net

Ryan and Faulds
Wilton, CT
203-762-9492
Doug Faulds doug@ryanandfaulds.com

Moody & O’Brien
New Canaan, CT
203-966-4877
moodyobriendllc@optonline.net

RKW Land Surveying
New Canaan, CT
203-966-3501

CIVIL ENGINEERS

Land Tech Consultants, Inc.
Westport, CT
203-454-2110
Chris Allan cpallan@landtechconsult.com
www.landtechconsult.com

Frangione Engineering, LLC
New Canaan, CT
203-554-9551
Rob Frangione, P.E. Rob.frangione@frangione.net
www.frangione.net

Cabezas-DeAngelis, LLC
Bridgeport, CT
203-330-8700
Chris DeAngelis, P.E. chrisd@cd-engineers.com
www.cd-engineers.com

Artel Engineering Group, LLC
Brookfield, CT
203-740-2033
Dianius Virbickas, P.E. artel@artelengineering.com
www.artelengineering.com

Kellard/Sessions Consulting
Armonk, NY
914-273-2323
Dave Sessions dsessions@kelses.com
www.kelses.com

Ben Doto, P.E.
Danbury, CT
203-743-3424
ben@dotocivil.com

Fusion Engineering PC
White Plains, NY
914-358-5009
Paul Berte, P.E. paul@fusionepc.com
www.fusionengineeringpc.com

Ralph J. Gallagher, Jr. P.E.
Danbury, CT
203-798-9640
Ralph Gallagher rjgjrassoc@aol.com
www.rjgallagherjrassoc.com

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

Benedek & Ticehurst
Bedford Village, NY
914-234-9666
Glenn Ticehurst glenn@btlandarch.com
www.btlandarch.com

The Laurel Rock Co.
Wilton, CT
203-544-0062
www.laurelrock.com

Studer Design Associates Inc.
Ridgefield, CT
203-894-1428
Craig Studer craig@studerdesignassociates.com

Joseph Pajonas Studio, LLC
Greenwich, CT
203-321-5611
Joseph Pajonas jp@jpsla.com
www.jpsla.com

SOIL SCIENTISTS

William Kenny Assoc. LLC
Fairfield, CT
203-366-0588
Bill Kenny wkenny@wkassociates.net
www.wkassociates.net

JMM Wetland Consulting
Newtown, CT
203-364-0345
Jim McManus www.jmmwetland.com

Evans Associates
Bethany, CT
203-393-0690
Beth Evans beth@eaec-inc.com
www.eaec-inc.com

Land-Tech Consultants, Inc
Westport, CT
203-454-2110
www.landtechconsult.com

Steven Danzer
Stamford, CT
203-451-8319
danzer@ctwetlandsconsulting.com
www.ctwetlandsconsulting.com

Otto R. Theall
Norwalk, CT
203-845-0278
soilwetlandsci@aol.com

HOME INSPECTORS

Pillar To Post
Fairfield, CT
203-831-8100
Nick Barnett Nick.barnett@pillartopost.com
www.fairfield.pillartopost.com

Dominion Inspection Services
Mahopac, NY
800-735-5935
Martin Greenberg

CT SURVEYORS

Paul Hiro, P.C.
35 Danbury Rd.
New Milford, CT 06776
860.354.6599
paulhiro@gmail.com

Walter Skidd
1992 Stratfield Rd
Fairfield, CT 06432
203.373.0401
www.walterskiddlandsurveyor.com

SE. Minor & Co
81 Holly Hill Lane P.O. Box 92
Greenwich, CT 06830
203.869.0136
www.seminor.com

Aidan C McCann, LS
Sound View Engineers & Land Surveyors
239 Glenville Rd.
Suite 300
Greenwich, CT 06831
203.532.1300
aidan.soundview@verizon.net

James Osborne Surveying & Engineering
14 Aspetuck Ave.
New Milford, CT 06776
860.354.5452

Leo Leonard
180 Post Road East
Westport, CT 06880
203.226.7861

Jason Spath Sr. PLC
The Huntington Co. LLC
140 Sherman St.
Fairfield, CT 06824
203.259.1091
Jspath@huntllc.com

RKW Land Surveying
22 East Ave. P.O. Box 788
New Canaan, CT 06840
203.966.3501

Tony D’Andrea, P.E. & L.S.
Rocco D’Andrea, INC
6 Neil Lane P.O. Box 549
Riverside, CT 06878
203.637.1779
ALD@rvdi.com

Paul Brautigam
Brautigam Land Surveyors P.C.
25 Church Hill Rd.
Newtown, CT 06470
203.270.7810
Survey1@brautigamland.com
www.brautigamland.com

Moody & Obrien Surveyors
22 Vitti St.
New Canaan, CT
203.966.4877
moodyobrienllc@sbcglobal.net
www.moodyobrienllc.com

John Farnsworth & Ass.
11 Main St.
New Milford, CT 06776
P.O. Box 814
860.354.1251
860.354.7691
jfarnsworth@snet.net

NY SURVEYORS

Stephen T. Johnson, L.S.
H. Stanley Johnson and Company P.C.
42 Smith Ave.
Mount Kisco, NY 10549

Eric Link
Roland Link
Link Land Surveyors
21 Clark Place #1B
Mahopac, NY
elink@linklandsurveyors.com
rlink@linklandsurveyors.com
www.linklandsurveyors.com

Frank Fowler, P.E. & L.S
72 South Rd.
Holmes, NY
845.878.2152
Fgf3pels@aol.com

Bibbo Associates
293 Route 100 – Suite 203
Somers, NY 10589
914-277-5805
bibboassociates.com

Aristotle Bournazos P.C.
20 Cedar Street
New Rochelle, NY 10801
914.633.0100
absurv@aol.com

Home projects can be daunting, but the right team of professionals by your side can help ensure a smooth process from start to finish.

Schedule a consultation for your home project in Connecticut or New York with
DeMotte Architects:

203 431 8890

Click to Contact Us

residential architecture design logo

DeMotte Architects, based in Ridgefield CT, specializes in residential architecture in Fairfield County Connecticut, Westchester County New York, and surrounding areas. From luxury custom homes to small additions, we're here for your home architecture needs. Serving Greenwich CT & beyond.

Home Advisor

Screened & Approved HomeAdvisor Pro

Contact Us

635 Danbury Road, Ridgefield, CT Phone:(203) 431 8890 Hours:M - S 6:00-6:00 Email:brad@demottearchitects.com Web:demottearchitects.com

Houzz

Brad DeMotte in Ridgefield, CT on Houzz
© Copyright 2019 - DeMotte Architects